Oddball Anime Music Combo – Norio Wakamoto Sings Madoka’s Credens Justitiam

Never one to pass up on an opportunity for silliness, this was one anime song cover we just had to share. Norio Wakamoto and Madoka together in perfect harmony is something that’ll be most dissonant, but enjoyable because of it.

If you’ve been keeping track of the anime fandom for any stretch of time, you’re probably no stranger to the effect that Puella Magi Madoka Magica has had. The anime, combined with Yuki Kajiura’s appropriately foreboding soundtrack, brought about a memorable experience that’s often talked about as a most excellent twist on the magical girl genre.

So to say that we love the music is a bit of an understatement, especially when tracks like “Sis puella magica!” draw us in with their melancholia, foreshadowing the fate of the magical girls in Madoka. But before the show even gets to its depressing stage, the anime serves up some more heroic tracks, none of which stand out more than Mami’s theme, “Credens Justitiam.”

In the original “Credens Justitiam,” you had a song delivered by the lilting chorus provided by Kalafina, which provided the song with a soaring quality that spoke of lofty ideals, giving it a sense of grace, and, of course, beauty. Here, we have longtime anime seiyuu Norio Wakamoto giving his rendition of “Credens Justitiam.” Wakamoto, known for voicing characters as The Emperor Charles Zi Britannia in Code Geass, Oda Nobunaga in Sengoku Basara, and the narrator in Hayate the Combat Butler.

His delivery contrasts with the original’s aspirational qualities, instead, coming off as being rather silly as his trademark deep voice rolls the “rr” sounds in the song and the way he harmonizes. Needless to say, it’s a novel and hilarious twist on a well-known song that’s become part of the anime music/Yuki Kajiura canon that’ll succeed at the very least in bringing a few chuckles or grimaces, especially when he narrates about magical girls halfway though this song or simply roars/groans all the way to the finish.

Simoun’s Soundtrack’s Orchestral Flair and Hisaishi and Touhou Blendings

Toshihiko Sahashi’s discography over the years is probably strongest around 2003-2006, where his releases included the Gunslinger Girl soundtrack and the subject of today’s review, the magnificent Simoun soundtrack which features an orchestral score complete with a main theme that is likely to engross the listener.  In fact, looking at how well it channels the themes of war and loss, this may very well be Sahashi’s best work and our writer, Yu, feels it’s deserving of a masterpiece rating.

We also updated recently with a single track drawn from a combination of Joe Hisaishi’s music and music from the Touhou shooter franchise.  Do check it out if you’re curious to see how the wonderful main theme from Howl’s Moving Castle blends in so well with Cirno’s theme, all of it set to an orchestral sound sample that turns out really nicely.  Definitely do check out this combination, titled “Cirno’s Moving Castle” by kaztora.

Two Lackluster Anime Music Reviews

Today, we present two reviews of albums that just don’t hold up compared to better anime music that exists out there. In the first review, Aftershok takes a look at the opening theme from the currently-airing Yuru Yuri♪♪ titled Yes! Yuyuyu☆Yuru Yuri♪♪ and demonstrates that even though seiyuu collaborations can be enjoyable at times, in this instance, it’s just a mess, especially when the B-side is taken into account.

Maskerade, on the other hand, presents us with a review of Best of Jazzin’ for Ghibli. As you can probably guess, this album features Ghibli film themes, ranging from Laputa to Princess Mononoke set to jazz. Unfortunately, the execution is way off and leaves much to be desired, especially when they try to throw some rap around in a way that never really makes a whole lot of sense.

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